Monday, March 25, 2013

I’m definitely not a “normal user”


Today I noticed something... out of the sudden my cellphone received about 150 whatsapp messages...

...odd

to make it short, this weekend I was checking the wife tablet that has a sim slot... and as I changed from cyanogenmod to samsung official rom on the i9100... the reinsert of the sim made the phone pick up APN’s for network access on his own..

Well... it did it wrong. Phone was going thru “wap” instead of the full internet access (which is another apn of course) It took me 10 minuntes to figure out.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Big Banks (a guest post fron John Gower)

This is a guest post.
Apparently, bloggingda'bullshit is getting in the fancy trend of letting other people write for it. Nevertheless, the post seems quite adequate for some of the "bullshit" I've been shoving on this webpage...
   

At one time, the most popular television show in the United States featured a banker who would do anything to keep your account.

 


Fans of “The Beverly Hillbillies” (which is still in worldwide syndication and on cable’s TV Land) will fondly remember Milton Drysdale (played by actor Raymond Bailey), the head of the Commerce Bank of Beverly Hills, Ca.

Drysdale was obsessively focused on keeping accidental millionaire J.D. Clampett’s fortune on deposit at the Commerce Bank. So focused that he became a part of the Clampett family’s daily lives. Hilarity ensued.
Consider just some of Drysdale’s actions: he recreated a replica of the Clampett’s hill country log cabin in their backyard, complete with cawing rooster. He followed them back to their Ozark homeland and bought a local bank there just to maintain a controlling interest in their money. He took some rock salt in his rear end from Granny’s shotgun. He dressed up as a woman and an Indian chief.
The list goes on and on, through nine seasons of television in an era where you could have 36-episode seasons. The message was clear: Drysdale was a banker who cared. Maybe not for the best of reasons, but he really, truly, cared about the account.